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Stacy Fairchild
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:02 pm    Post subject: Stacy Fairchild Reply with quote



BODY IN RIVER IDENTIFIED AS MISSING GIRL'S

Michael B. Lafferty
the Columbus Dispatch
February 6, 1989


The body of a 17-year-old girl, missing since Thursday, was found yesterday in the Hocking River, Lancaster police said.

Stacy Fairchild, a Lancaster High School senior and daughter of a vice
president of Central Trust, had not been seen since leaving work at the
River Valley Mall about 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Her body was found in the Hocking River about 5:30 p.m. yesterday south of the mall and several hundred yards east of Ety Road.

''I suspect foul play,'' said Detective William Parrish.

The body was downstream from where the girl's burned car was found Friday, and Parrish said it is possible the body was placed in the river near the car and floated downstream.

Stacy was the daughter of David and Rebekah Fairchild of Lancaster. The
Fairchilds have a son, Chris, 13.

Mr. Fairchild, 42, said he began searching for his daughter Thursday night
after she failed to return home from her job at the Deb Shop in the River
Valley Mall.

He said store employees said she left work about 8:30 p.m. because the store was not busy.

Mr. Fairchild said he reported his daughter missing to police at 12:15 a.m.
Friday.

''She didn't run off. She didn't take anything with her. She had the clothes
on her back,'' Mr. Fairchild said.

Her car was found burned beside a railroad track near the Hocking River
about 5 p.m. Friday, about a mile west of the mall.

Mr. Fairchild said Stacy normally came straight home on school nights.

Shelley Figgins, a classmate who said she and Stacy were best friends, said she last saw Stacy on Wednesday.

She said Stacy was ''very outgoing'' and had many friends.

Figgins said Stacy never went home through the area where her car was found.

Don Wright of Lancaster found the burned car while he was walking his dog.

''I became concerned right away because the license plates were still on the car,'' he said. Wright contacted the police, who traced the vehicle and
identified it as belonging to the Fairchilds.

Wright said the area along the railroad tracks is frequented by people who
go there to drink beer and shoot guns.

The car was towed to the Lancaster police garage.

Authorities searched the area near the car and, after finding nothing,
shifted to the area east of Ety Road where the body was found.

Lancaster Police Detective Norm Ream said police called in the FBI because of the possibility that someone had kidnapped Stacy, hoping her father's position with a financial institution would bring a large ransom. But he said no ransom demand was made of Stacy's parents.

Asked if there were any suspects in the death, Ream said, ''We do have some leads. It's just a matter of following up on all the information we can
get.''

Parrish said the body was fully clothed and floating under some limbs in the river when found.

The body will be taken to the Franklin County coroner's office for an
autopsy today. Parrish would not speculate on a cause of death.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:05 pm    Post subject: NO SUSPECTS YET IN GIRL'S KILLING, PROSECUTOR SAYS Reply with quote

LANCASTER TEEN-AGER DROWNED
NO SUSPECTS YET IN GIRL'S KILLING, PROSECUTOR SAYS


Jim Woods
The Columbsu Dispatch
February 7, 1989


Stacy Fairchild, 17, drowned in the Hocking River Thursday night, an autopsy showed yesterday.

The case is being investigated as a homicide, Fairfield County Prosecutor
David L. Landefeld said.

Stacy, a Lancaster High School senior, had a wound on the side of her head, but it is not believed to have caused her death, Landefeld said yesterday.

''We're following up on a number of leads, but we have no suspects. It's an unusual crime for Lancaster,'' he said. He did not elaborate on how the
killing might have occurred.

Stacy's body was found Sunday floating face up in a tangle of branches, just past a small railroad bridge. The site is several hundred yards behind the River Valley Mall, where she was last seen leaving work Thursday night.

The river is about 2 feet deep where searchers found the body.

Tests to determine if Stacy was sexually assaulted are being conducted by the Franklin County coroner's office, which did the autopsy, Landefeld said.

Stacy was fully clothed, but her shoes were missing, he said. He declined
comment on whether her purse or coat had been found.

Detectives yesterday made plaster casts of footprints found near the
railroad bridge.

Witnesses said they saw a fire about 9:45 p.m. Thursday near where Stacy's 1982 Dodge was found burned Friday. The car was near the river and less than a mile west of the mall.

Police don't know where the body entered the river, but it was found
downstream from the car.

On Sunday, the FBI stopped a maroon pickup about 9 p.m. near Rt. 33 and I- 270 in Columbus because it matched the description of a vehicle seen near the mall Thursday night, said FBI agent David Hanna.

Lancaster police questioned the vehicle's occupants and released them, Hanna said.

The FBI had entered the case Friday because it was at first thought
extortion could have been involved, he said.

Stacy's father, David Fairchild, 42, is a vice president with Central Trust
Co. in Lancaster.

The FBI is no longer involved in the case.

At Lancaster High School, the flag was at half-staff and a moment of silence was observed, said Principal Bill Hughes. Guidance counselors were available for students who wanted to discuss Stacy's death, he said.

''I think most of the students are confused. Later in the week I think they
will be dealing with their feelings of sadness, fear and anger,'' Hughes
said.

Stacy was described by teachers as an above-average student who kept a low profile, administrators said.

Funeral services for Stacy are planned for 1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Maple Street United Methodist Church in Lancaster.

The Frank E. Smith Funeral Home is handling arrangements.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:06 pm    Post subject: INFORMATION SOUGHT IN TEEN'S SLAYING Reply with quote

INFORMATION SOUGHT IN TEEN'S SLAYING

The Columbus Dispatch
February 8, 1989


Authorities are seeking the public's help for clues in the death of Stacy
Fairchild, 17, Fairfield County Prosecutor David Landefeld said.

Stacy's body was found Sunday in the Hocking River near the River Valley
Mall, where she worked at the Deb Shop. Stacy was last seen leaving the mall at 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Fairfield County Coroner Stephen Hodsden has ruled that Stacy died of
drowning, and police are investigating the case as a homicide.

Landefeld yesterday asked anyone who saw anything suspicious in the mall area between 8:30 p.m. and midnight Thursday to contact police.

Landefeld said rumors about earlier assaults in the mall parking lot are
untrue. Landefeld said no such cases have been reported to him.

Funeral services for Stacy are scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Thursday at Maple
Street United Methodist Church.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:08 pm    Post subject: POLICE SEEK PRINTS IN DROWNING CASE Reply with quote

POLICE SEEK PRINTS IN DROWNING CASE

Jim Woods
The Columbus Dispatch
February 10, 1989


Police yesterday were trying to recover fingerprints from a wallet that
belonged to Stacy Fairchild, 17, who was found drowned in the Hocking River on Sunday.

Prosecutor David L. Landefeld said yesterday that Stacy's death is being
treated as a homicide, but there is not enough evidence to say she was
slain.

A citizen located the wallet and reported it to police about 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Lt. William Parrish said. He would not say where the wallet was found.

The wallet, which was wet, was not found in the Hocking River, Landefeld
said. He said the wallet contained Stacy's identification, but he did not
elaborate on other contents. The wallet was sent to the Columbus police
crime laboratory.

Stacy was found in the river behind the River Valley Mall, where she worked in the Deb Shop. She had been missing since she left work at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 2. Her car was found burned last Friday less than a mile from the mall.

Landefeld and Parrish said the results of autopsy tests at the Franklin
County coroner's office might be a key.

Yesterday, more than 600 people, mostly classmates of Stacy's at Lancaster High School, packed into the Maple Street United Methodist Church to attend Stacy's funeral.

The Rev. F. Raymond Sharritts remembered Stacy as a girl who liked to joke and enjoyed ''doing the fun things that any teen-ager does.'' He said she also displayed a deep love for her family.

The police department has received many calls about the case. Landefeld said a number of rumors have circulated.

Landefeld and Parrish labeled as untrue rumors that a number of rapes have occurred at the River Valley Mall.

The Deb Shop and other stores at the mall had recently received crank phone calls in which the caller hung up without saying anything, Landefeld said.

Landefeld said the calls are not believed to be a significant part of the
case.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:10 pm    Post subject: CAUSE OF FIRE IN DEAD GIRL'S CAR UNKNOWN Reply with quote

CAUSE OF FIRE IN DEAD GIRL'S CAR UNKNOWN

The Columbus Dispatch
February 15, 1989


The state fire marshal's office can't find out what was used to burn the car
that belonged to Stacy Fairchild, 17, Fairfield County Prosecutor David
Landefeld said yesterday.

Stacy was found drowned in the Hocking River behind the River Valley Mall on Feb. 5. She was last seen alive at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 2 as she left her job at the mall.

Witnesses told police they saw a fire at 9:45 p.m. Feb. 2 near where Stacy's car was found burned the next day along railroad tracks. Her body was recovered from the river, less than a mile from the burned car.

Investigators cannot say where the fire started in Stacy's 1982 Dodge, said David Whitaker, assistant Lancaster fire chief. It most likely started
inside the car, he said.

Authorities are awaiting test results from an autopsy performed on Stacy by the Franklin County coroner's office, Landefeld said.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:12 pm    Post subject: NO DRUGS FOUND IN LANCASTER GIRL'S BODY Reply with quote

NO DRUGS FOUND IN LANCASTER GIRL'S BODY

Jim Woods
The Columbus Dispatch
March 15, 1989


Autopsy results issued yesterday indicated no drugs or alcohol were found in the blood of Stacy Fairchild, 17, but authorities refused to say whether she had been sexually assaulted.

The autopsy, conducted by the Franklin County coroner, found that Stacy
drowned, said Fairfield County Prosecutor David L. Landefeld.

HER BODY was found Feb. 5 in the Hocking River near a railroad bridge. It
was a few hundred yards behind the River Valley Mall, where Stacy was last seen, leaving work at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 2.

Her burned-out car was found Feb. 3 along the railroad tracks about a
half-mile from where the body eventually was discovered.

When asked whether the coroner's toxicology tests showed that Stacy had been sexually assaulted, Landefeld said ''We're not going to comment on that.''

He also refused to release the autopsy report, saying it was not a public
record.

''The investigation is important to us. We want to have a case we feel we
can win,'' Landefeld said. ''At this point there's no reason to release
everything in the autopsy. At this point we can use the information in our
investigation.''

Fairfield County Coroner Dr. Stephen Hodsden and Lt. William Parrish of the Lancaster Police Department refused comment on the autopsy, referring all questions to Landefeld.

''We're still investigating it as a homicide; nothing has changed,''
Landefeld said. He stopped short of calling it a slaying.

''I don't have all the facts. It could be any number of things. I guess I'm
not prepared to say that'' it was a slaying, Landefeld said.

The autopsy was unable to determine an exact time of death because of the low temperatures when her body was found.

Stacy's wallet was found Feb. 8 and fingerprints were recovered, but have
yet not been analyzed, Landefeld said. Her shoes and coat have not been
found, he said.

''We're still asking for any public input,'' Landefeld said. ''We have
individuals we're looking at. To call them suspects is too strong a word.''

Rumors have continued to spread. Landefeld said one recent rumor was that someone had confessed to causing Stacy's death.

''To the contrary, no one has confessed,'' Landefeld said. ''I think the
rumors have been centered at the high school. I think the kids have a real interest in this case - understandably.''

Stacy was a senior at Lancaster High School.

Parrish said no connection has been established between the investigation of Stacy's death and a police report of a woman who said she was harassed while walking near the mall Feb. 7.

A 21-year-old woman who lives in Muirwood Apartments told police that a man in a silver sports car twice offered her a ride home. She refused and ran home.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:14 pm    Post subject: LANCASTER TEEN-AGER'S UNSOLVED DEATH HAUNTS FAMILY, POLICE Reply with quote

LANCASTER TEEN-AGER'S UNSOLVED DEATH HAUNTS FAMILY, POLICE

Jim Woods
The Columbus Dispatch
February 4, 1990



Stacy Fairchild was last seen walking into the dimly lit parking lot of
River Valley Mall on the cold, rainy night of Feb. 2, 1989.

What happened next remains a mystery.

Stacy's body was found three days later in the Hocking River, a few hundred yards behind the mall. Fairfield County Coroner Stephen Hodsden ruled that she had drowned.

The 17-year-old's family, classmates at Lancaster High School and the
community were stunned and mystified.

County Prosecutor David Landefeld said Stacy's death is being investigated as a homicide. He stops short of saying she was murdered.

''We've got a lot of physical evidence, and you can draw multiple
conclusions from what the evidence tells you,'' Landefeld said. ''We're
going to investigate it as a homicide until we can somehow resolve it
otherwise.''

It is a daily ritual for Sgt. Norman Ream, a 21-year veteran of the
Lancaster police force, to take out the investigative file and pore over the
details.

''It is the most baffling case I've ever been associated with,'' he said.
''I think about it every day.''

Police have interviewed more than 200 people and put in uncounted hours, Ream said. He is following leads, but a solution does not appear imminent.

Stacy's father, David Fairchild, says he also thinks about the death every
day.

''Any number of things could have happened. I think somebody knows
something, and they're not saying,'' Fairchild said. ''I don't know how they
could live with themselves.''

Stacy worked an after-school job at the Deb Shop in the mall. She usually
got off work at about 9:30 p.m. and sometimes went to a friend's house.

Business was slow the night of Feb. 2, so the boss sent her home early,
sometime between 8:45 and 9 p.m., Fairchild said. A male classmate, the last reported person to see her alive, recalls a brief conversation and watching her leave the mall and walk toward the back parking lot. She was driving a 1982 Dodge Aries.

Most of the lights around the edge of the lot were off because of
construction on a mall addition, Fairchild said. When he didn't hear from
his daughter at 11:30 p.m., Fairchild began a search. The roads had turned icy that night, so he thought his daughter might have had an accident. He stayed out until 5 a.m.

Witnesses later told police they saw a fire at about 12:30 a.m. Feb. 3 along a railroad track, less than a mile from the mall, Landefeld said. The
burned-out Dodge was found there later that day.

The FBI was called on the suspicion that extortion could be involved because Fairchild is an assistant vice president of Central Trust Co., a bank based in Newark, Ohio. The FBI dropped its involvement after her body was found.

Her body was discovered Sunday, Feb. 5, along the river bank near a railroad trestle.

An autopsy revealed a small wound on Stacy's head, but it probably wouldn't have been serious enough for her to lose consciousness, Landefeld said.

The autopsy couldn't even pinpoint the time or day of Stacy's death because her body had been in cold water, Landefeld said. He ordered results of the autopsy sealed. He has refused comment on whether Stacy was sexually
assaulted.

Stacy was clothed when her body was found, but her shoes were missing. Two teen-age boys told The Dispatch last summer that they found Stacy's wallet Feb. 8 on the banks of Hunter's Run, a tributary of the Hocking River, about 3 miles from where the body was found.

Fairchild said he believes his daughter might have been with someone she
knew before she died because there were no signs of a struggle.

''You have to know her. Unless the person had a knife or gun, she would have fought. She was very feisty,'' Fairchild said.

Landefeld said four people were looked at ''very closely'' during the
investigation. He said lie detector tests were administered but declined
comment on whether DNA tests have been used.

A few men gave false ''confessions'' that didn't match the evidence in
Stacy's death, Landefeld said.

Fairchild believes police have done a decent job.

Getting over Stacy's death has been hard for Fairchild, his wife, Rebekah,
and their son, Chris.

''For me, the hardest part is going into her room and her not being there,''
Fairchild said. ''Or to see other girls her age that remind us a lot of
her.''


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 7:34 pm    Post subject: Database key to 16-year old murder Reply with quote

Database key to 16-year old murder

Carl Burnett
The Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
May 22, 2005


Lancaster -- Sixteen years ago Stacy Fairchild left work at River Valley Mall and never made it home.

Her body was found three days after she left work Feb. 2, 1989. She was found in 18 inches of water about a third of a mile south of Ety Road by a person walking his dog. Her burned car also was found in the area.

She was 17 at the time of her death. Detectives have been investigating the murder ever since.

"It will always be open until we find the person who murdered her," said Deputy Police Chief David Bailey.

Murder does not have a statute of limitations. And Capt. Kelly Norris, chief of detectives, said they still have evidence that might link a killer to the crime.

"We do have DNA evidence and if we ever find a match, we'll know who killed her," Norris said.

The chance of finding a match is improving. The pool of people who have to register DNA with the state expanded three-fold.

Under a law that took effect Wednesday, DNA samples from all convicted felons and a handful of serious misdemeanors involving sexual offenses will be collected for inclusion a national data base.

That includes felons now in the Fairfield County Jail and at the Southeastern Correctional Institution.

Ohio has been collecting DNA samples from the most violent felons since 1996. In 2002, Ohio expanded the list of qualifying offenses to 57.

"(On Wednesday, we began) collecting DNA from more than 100,000 felons currently incarcerated or on probation or parole in Ohio," said Ohio Attorney General Jim Petro in a news release. "When those profiles are entered into the database and compared to DNA evidence from unsolved crimes, light will shine on mysteries long shrouded in darkness."

At the Southeastern Correctional Institution, located on B.I.S. Road outside of Lancaster, all inmates who fall under the new criteria will be tested on June 1.

"This is going to be done statewide in all prison facilities," said Rick Chuvalas, prison spokesman. "We estimate it will be about 640 people here at SCI."

Fairfield County Sheriff Dave Phalen said by increasing the pool of DNA samples, law enforcement agencies across the state and nation will be able to compare samples and identify the culprits committing crimes.

Phalen said jail personnel have been trained to use the mouth swab to gather DNA from prisoners and began taking samples Wednesday. The samples are sent to the Ohio's Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation.

"I think this will lead to more arrests as the database grows," Phalen said. "Often, we find DNA evidence at crime scenes but have trouble matching it. By creating this larger pool of samples on record, our chances of making arrests will increase."

"BCI sends the samples to private laboratories for processing and the results are then put into the national data base, the Combined DNA Index System, where they are compared to a database of DNA evidence collected from unsolved crimes in Ohio and throughout the county," Phalen said.

Any matches are reported to the law enforcement agency investigating an unsolved crime.

BCI Superintendent John Monce said DNA has aided in more than 1,200 investigations in Ohio and in other states since Ohio started collecting data. Monce said DNA sample collections will grow from about 10,000 they collect annually before the bill was enacted to more than 30,000 annually.

Maybe one of those DNA samples will lead back to Lancaster and the young girl whose life was ended that cold February day 16 years ago.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 6:54 pm    Post subject: Police: Arrested man's DNA linked to murder 19 years ago Reply with quote

Police: Arrested man's DNA linked to murder 19 years ago

Michelle George
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
January 31, 2008


LANCASTER -- Lancaster Police said they hope DNA evidence from an armed robbery will help close the 1989 homicide case of a Lancaster teen.

Lendy William Dysart, 44, of Lancaster, was arrested on a warrant at 4:45 p.m. Wednesday at the Fairfield County Jail, where he had been detained on an unrelated robbery charge. Police said his DNA is linked to the robbery and the nearly 19-year-old slaying.

Dysart now faces one count of aggravated murder and one count of murder in connection with the death of Stacy Fairchild , 17.

He is in currently in jail on a $1 million bond. His arraignment is scheduled for 1 p.m. today in Fairfield County Municipal Court. A press conference is set for 10:30 a.m. today at the Lancaster Police Department, 130 S. Broad St.

"We're very thankful it's happened after all these years," Fairchild 's father David Fairchild said Wednesday. "We still have a long way to go."

Stacy Fairchild 's body was discovered Feb. 5, 1989, submerged in the Hocking River. That was three days after she failed to return home from her job at the Deb Shop in Lancaster's River Valley Mall.

Police have had multiple suspects during the past 19 years, but until Wednesday no one had been charged with the teen's death.

A break in the unsolved crime came June 27.

That's when Lancaster detectives were notified by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation there was a DNA link between the Fairchild case and evidence collected from a March 2006 unsolved armed robbery of the Network Tan and Video in Lancaster, said Lt. Dan Shupp of the Lancaster Police Department. At the time, the robbery suspect's identity was unknown.

In September 2007, Lancaster police again were contacted by BCI. Tests showed DNA from the robbery and the Fairchild case were linked to Dysart's DNA sample, Shupp said.

A warrant was issued for Dysart, who had been released that month from the Montgomery Education and Pre-Release Center in Dayton. He had been incarcerated there since October of 2006 for a burglary conviction stemming from a break-in at Sierra Metals in Lancaster, Shupp said.

The warrant was for one count of aggravated burglary and two counts of aggravated robbery in connection with the Network Tan incident. He was booked Sept. 8, into Fairfield County Jail, where he remained on $100,000 bond.

Detectives reviewed the Fairchild case file and conducted interviews with witnesses while working the case. This past week, detectives received information confirming a link between Dysart and the murder of Stacy Fairchild .

On Wednesday police declined to reveal the connection, if any, between Fairchild and Dysart.

Tuesday will mark the 19th anniversary of the day the teen's body was found.

Fairchild 's parents, David and Rebekah, first notified police of their daughter's disappearance when she didn't return home from work Feb. 2, 1989.

According to the police report, the Fairchilds notified Lancaster police at 2:05 a.m. Feb. 3. The report states that Stacy Fairchild usually returned home no later than 11 p.m. on the nights she worked.

An investigation involving the FBI followed. Stacy Fairchild 's 1982 black Dodge Aries was found by someone walking a dog around 5 p.m. Feb. 3.

The car was parked by the railroad tracks about a mile south of Collins Road in Lancaster. The car, which had been set on fire, was burned to its frame.

Her fully clothed body was found two days later submerged in about 18 inches to 2 feet of water in the Hocking River, about a mile south of Ety Road.

Three days after her body was found, her wallet was discovered near Hunter's Run Bridge on Lincoln Avenue.

Timeline of Events:

*Feb. 2, 1989 -- Stacy Fairchild , 17, of Lancaster was reported missing by her parents, David and Rebekah Fairchild , when she failed to return home from work.

*Feb. 3, 1989 -- Fairchild 's burned out vehicle was found parked beside railroad tracks near Collins Road in Lancaster.

*Feb. 5, 1989 -- Fairchild 's fully-clothed body was discovered submerged in the Hocking River.

*Feb. 8, 1989 -- Fairchild 's wallet was located near Hunter's Run bridge on Lincoln Avenue.

*June 27, 2007 -- Lancaster police are notified by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation that there might have been a forensic link between the Fairchild case and a robbery at Network Tan and Video

in Lancaster

*Sept. 4, 2007 -- BCI notified Lancaster police that the link between the Fairchild case and the Network Tan case are linked to Lendy William Dysart's convicted offender sample.

*Sept. 8, 2007 -- Lancaster police arrested Dysart on one count of aggravated burglary and two counts of aggravated robbery in connection to the incident at Network Tan. He was placed in Fairfield County Jail on a $100,000 bond.

*Jan. 30, 2008 -- Lancaster police arrested Dysart in connection to the murder of Stacy Fairchild . He was charged with one count of aggravated murder and one count of murder and was booked in Fairfield County Jail. His bond was set at $1 million.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 6:56 pm    Post subject: Man charged in 1989 killing Reply with quote

Man charged in 1989 killing
DNA links him to crime, victim's father says

By Matthew Marx
The Columbus Dispatch
January 31, 2008


Nineteen years after Stacy Fairchild disappeared from the River Valley Mall and turned up dead in the Hocking River, Lancaster police have charged a man in the teen's killing.

Lendy William Dysart, 44, was in Fairfield County jail last night, charged with aggravated murder and murder.

Fairchild, 17, was last seen alive walking into the parking lot of the Lancaster mall, where she worked, on Feb. 2, 1989. Her body was found three days later in the river, and her wallet three days after that.

"You have a lot of emotions right now," her father, David Fairchild, said last night, hours after learning that Dysart had been charged. "It's going to be 19 years on Saturday."

The memory of Stacy and the mystery surrounding her death had never left the thoughts and prayers of her family, Fairchild said, speaking for his wife, Rebekah, and their son, Chris.

"We're just very happy. We've never given up hope."

Investigators had several suspects over the years, but a match of DNA samples helped link Dysart to his daughter's case, Fairchild said.

"We've known about this for a long time, since September," Fairchild said.

Dysart has been in jail since September on two counts of aggravated robbery in an unrelated case, authorities said. DNA found in that case linked him to the murder, Fairchild said.

Before that, Dysart spent several months incarcerated by the state on a breaking-and-entering conviction out of Fairfield County, computer records show.

Dysart is divorced and has a young daughter with another woman, public records show.

What began as an exhaustive probe into the death of Stacy Fairchild (police had conducted hundreds of interviews, Dispatch archives show) eventually turned into a cold case that left the community unsettled.

The day after the Lancaster High School student's parents reported her missing, her car was found -- burned -- less than a mile from the mall, which is off Rt. 33.

After her body was discovered, clothed but shoeless, on a Hocking River bank on Feb. 5, 1989, the coroner ruled she had drowned, although the autopsy revealed a small head wound.

Her wallet was found three days later, in a tributary of the river about 3 miles from where the body was found.

Lt. Dan Shupp of Lancaster's detective bureau is to hold a news conference this morning to provide details about the case.

Assistant County Prosecutor Gregg Marx refused to comment on the investigation last night.

In the afternoon, Dysart is to appear in Municipal Court on the murder charges.

David Fairchild said he and his family won't attend because they think that the less said about the case now, the better.

"There's still a long way to go. We'll take it one day at a time."
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:00 pm    Post subject: Suspect in 19-year-old murder arraigned, won't face death Reply with quote

Suspect in 19-year-old murder arraigned, won't face death penalty

By Mary Beth Lane
The Columbus Dispatch
January 31, 2008


LANCASTER, Ohio The suspect charged in the murder of a 17-year-old Lancaster High School senior 19 years ago won't get the death penalty, Fairfield County Prosecutor David Landefeld said this morning.

Lendy William Dysart, 44, was arraigned today in Fairfield County Municipal Court on aggravated-murder and murder charges related to the death of Stacy Fairchild. He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison, with a possibility of parole after 20 years.

Judge David A. Trimmer entered a not-guilty plea for Dysart today and ordered him held on a $1 million cash bond and $500,000 recognizance bond.

The murder mystery had gripped Lancaster residents ever since the teen's body was found submerged in the Hocking River Feb. 5, 1989, three days after her parents reported her missing when she did not return from her job at a store at the River Valley Mall along Rt. 33.

Landefeld, speaking at a news conference with Lancaster police this morning, said he will present the case to a grand jury Feb. 8.

He said he cannot seek the death penalty because none of the death-penalty specifications in state law in 1989 are applicable to the charges against Dysart.

There was not a sentence of life in prison without parole in state law at the time, either, Landefeld said.

The county coroner at the time ruled that Stacy died from drowning. This morning, Police Lt. Dan Shupp refused to elaborate on the specifics of the evidence that police have, including the particular DNA evidence that authorities say connects Dysart to the teen's death.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:04 pm    Post subject: A chance for peace at last Reply with quote

A chance for peace at last

Michelle George
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
February 1, 2008


LANCASTER -- It has been 19 years since Tabatha Levacy last saw Stacy Fairchild .

Levacy was 16 in 1989 when Fairchild was slain after leaving her job at River Valley Mall. But Levacy said she clearly remembers the dark-haired, 17-year-old girl who preceded her by one year at Lancaster High School.

"I didn't know her well, but she was a smart girl with a fantastic head on her shoulders," Levacy said Thursday.

Today, Levacy lives directly across the street from the home on Lendale Drive where Fairchild and her parents, David and Rebekah, lived when Stacy was killed.

And she said she is relieved an arrest has been made in her former schoolmate's case.

"When it happened, it didn't really affect me the way it does now that I'm a parent," Levacy said.

"I don't know how Stacy 's parents dealt with not knowing who was responsible for all these years. I don't think I could have that kind of self control."

Lancaster police arrested Lendy William Dysart in connection with the case late Wednesday afternoon. Dysart was arraigned in municipal court Thursday on one count of aggravated murder and one count of murder in the death of Fairchild .

Dysart is set to appear before a grand jury Feb. 8. He is in the Fairfield County Jail on a $1 million bond.

"I remember when that case first broke," said Sherry Murphy, who lives several houses down from the Fairchilds' former home. "It was a shock to have such a young girl be murdered like that. I'm glad now her mom and dad can have some rest."

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation contacted the Lancaster police department in September after confirming a DNA link between the Fairchild case and an unsolved local robbery.

Authorities said the DNA sample was a match for Dysart.

From September to this past week, Lancaster detectives said they did extensive research into the case in order to make the arrest.

"We're very thankful it's happened after all these years," Stacy 's father, David Fairchild , said following the arrest Wednesday.

So are others.

"I'm surprised it took 19 years," Murphy said. "I can't believe they finally found who did it, but it's a shame that it takes so long."

Lancaster Lt. Dan Shupp said at a press conference Thursday the Fairchild case was one that posed a lot of problems.

"This is one of the two most difficult cases I've dealt with," Shupp said. "In this case, we had to look back into people's memories, some of whom are no longer with us."

Lancaster Police Chief David Bailey said the department never had any intention of closing the case, even as time progressed.

"I'm sure it crossed everyone's mind as to whether it would go unsolved, but we knew that a crime of this nature would never be shelved," Bailey said.

Fairchild 's parents first notified police of their daughter's disappearance around 2:05 a.m. Feb. 3, 1989, when she didn't return home from work on Feb. 2.

Stacy Fairchild 's 1982 black Dodge Aries was found around 5 p.m. Feb. 3. parked on railroad tracks about a mile south of Collins Road in Lancaster. The car, which had been set on fire, was burned to its frame.

Her fully clothed body was found two days later submerged in about 18 inches to 2 feet of water in the Hocking River, about a mile south of Ety Road.

Levacy said she remembers how scared she felt in the days following the murder,

"It was odd to have something like this happen here and, I remember, people were afraid to go to the mall or walk around alone at night," Levacy said.

It's a feeling Bailey said is typical with murders in cities the size of Lancaster.

"In small jurisdictions, anything like this causes public alarm and creates a lot of fear," Bailey said.

And although an arrest has been made, detectives continue to seek more information from people who might know something about the case.

"This is still an open investigation and it's far from over," Shupp said.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:07 pm    Post subject: Evidence from DNA rekindled 1989 case Reply with quote

Evidence from DNA rekindled 1989 case

Mary Beth Lane
The Columbus Dispatch
February 1, 2008


LANCASTER, Ohio -- Saturday marks 19 years since 17-year-old Stacy Fairchild left her after-school job in the River Valley Mall about 8:45 p.m. and never went home to her parents.

By 2 a.m. on Feb. 3, 1989, David and Rebekah Fairchild were frantic and reported their daughter missing. It was a school night. She would have come home, they told police. Later that day, her Dodge Aries was found parked beside railroad tracks, burned to the frame. Two days later, the teenager's body was found, submerged in the Hocking River behind the mall.

For nearly two decades, the mystery lingered. Her parents grieved. Residents in the community still talked about the unsolved crime. Lancaster police worked on the case without success.

That changed Wednesday, when police charged a 44-year-old ex-convict from Lancaster named Lendy William Dysart with killing the Lancaster High School senior.

They used DNA evidence to do it, Lt. Dan Shupp said yesterday.

Dysart is charged with aggravated murder and murder. He faces a maximum of life in prison, eligible for parole after 20 years. A sentence of life without parole was not in state law in 1989, and the death-penalty specifications in state law at the time don't apply to the case, said Fairfield County Prosecutor David Landefeld, who plans to present the case to a grand jury next Friday.

Judge David Trimmer of Fairfield County Municipal Court entered a not-guilty plea for Dysart at his arraignment yesterday via video hookup, and ordered him held in lieu of $1 million cash bail and $500,000 recognizance bail.

Police yesterday described the path that led them to Dysart.

An autopsy determined that the cause of death was drowning and provided investigators with DNA evidence. Shupp refused to elaborate on the evidence or what preceded the drowning.

Last year, Shupp said, analysis by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation showed that the DNA matched DNA evidence collected from an armed robbery in 2006 at Network Tan and Video in Lancaster, and both matched a convicted-offender DNA sample from Dysart.

On Sept. 4, the very day that the state agency notified Lancaster detectives of the match, Dysart was getting out of state prison. He had served six months for breaking and entering at Sierra Metals in Lancaster in 2006. He and girlfriend Chasity D. Perkins, with whom he has a child, were found trying to cart off copper wires and tubes, according to court records.

Police arrested Dysart on Sept. 8 and charged him with aggravated burglary and aggravated robbery in the Network Tan and Video case and put him in the county jail in lieu of $100,000 bail.

He's been locked up since while detectives reviewed the Fairchild file, locating and interviewing potential witnesses and awaiting other test results from the state crime bureau.

Despite the passage of nearly two decades, police never considered this a cold case, Lancaster Police Chief David Bailey said.

"It was never closed," he said. "It was always on everyone's mind. I'm very, very proud of everybody for staying on task in this case."
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:08 pm    Post subject: Dysart indicted by grand jury for 1989 murder of Stacy Fairc Reply with quote

Dysart indicted by grand jury for 1989 murder of Stacy Fairchild

Michelle George
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
February 9, 2008


LANCASTER -- The man arrested in connection with the 1989 murder of Stacy Fairchild was indicted by a grand jury Friday morning.

Lendy William Dysart, 44, of Lancaster, was indicted on one count of murder and one count of aggravated murder in connection with Fairchild 's death.

Two Lancaster police detectives testified before the grand jury, said Fairfield County Assistant Prosecutor Gregg Marx.

Dysart's next court appearance will be before Judge Richard Berens at 1 p.m. Tuesday for his arraignment, Marx said.

Dysart was arrested on a warrant Jan. 30 by Lancaster police at the Fairfield County Jail, where he had been detained on an unrelated robbery charge.

Police said his DNA is linked to the robbery and the nearly 19-year-old slaying.

He was arraigned in Fairfield County Municipal Court on Jan. 31 and is in jail on a $1 million bond.

The body of Stacy Fairchild , 17, of Lancaster was discovered Feb. 5, 1989, submerged in the Hocking River.

That was three days after she failed to return home from her job at the Deb Shop in Lancaster's River Valley Mall.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:09 pm    Post subject: Attorney: Dysart 'shocked' by charges Reply with quote

Attorney: Dysart 'shocked' by charges

Michelle George
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
February 13, 2008


LANCASTER -- The attorney for a Lancaster man charged in the 1989 death of a teen is raising questions about the reliability of a DNA sample that led to his client's arrest.

Lendy William Dysart, 44, of Lancaster was arraigned in Judge Richard Berens' courtroom Tuesday. He pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated murder and one charge of murder in the death of Lancaster teen Stacy Fairchild .

Dysart's defense attorney Scott Wood said he plans to file a motion to hire a private investigator to study the DNA sample that linked Dysart to the 19-year-old murder.

"(Dysart) denies any involvement and was actually pretty shocked when he was initially charged," Wood said.

The body of Stacy Fairchild , 17, of Lancaster, was discovered Feb. 5, 1989, submerged in the Hocking River, three days after her parents reported her missing when she failed to return home from work.

The Lancaster Police Department arrested Dysart on Jan. 30 after samples gathered by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation linked Dysart's DNA sample to DNA recovered from the Fairchild crime scene.

At the time, Dysart was incarcerated in Fairfield County Jail on one count of aggravated burglary and two counts of aggravated robbery in connection with a 2006 unsolved armed robbery at Network Tan in Lancaster.

"We're concerned about how the DNA was collected and tested," Wood said. "It's unusual that there would be two old, unsolved cases that would both match one suspect."

A pretrial is set to be scheduled within the next few weeks for Dysart's case, Assistant Prosecutor Gregg Marx said.

Dysart remains in Fairfield County Jail on a $1 million bond.
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